Blog Archives

Who uses Condorcet methods now?

No parliament or legislature, or local government currently uses any Condorcet method to elect its members, but: “… a Condorcet method known as Nanson’s method was used in city elections in the U.S. town of Marquette, Michigan in the 1920s” … Continue reading
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Isn’t it more important to improve voter turnout?

It is important to improve voter engagement, which will translate, I believe, into improved voter turnout. But whether this is more- or less-important than improving the voting system is a false choice. While a new voting system is important and … Continue reading
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Are the voters sophisticated enough for this method?

Are voters sophisticated enough for this? It doesn’t matter. Such complexity as exists is primarily in the tally, and, to some extent, in the evaluation of the result. But, while we need to document and explain these for those who … Continue reading
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Can I still vote for only one Candidate?

Can you vote for only one candidate? Certainly, if you want. This means you fail to rank the other candidates relative to each other, simply saying that you like that one choice more than everyone else, and dislike all the … Continue reading
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Confusing if lowest first-preference wins, or largest doesn’t?

Firstly, the given tally procedure does not record nor report votes in terms of aggregate first-, or second-preferences, etc., and cannot be reverse-engineered to discover this. This is by design, and I would recommend against modifying the tally procedures to … Continue reading
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Campaigning for your next-preference support?

Another significant consequence of preferential voting (Condorcet methods, particularly, IRV less so) is that second- and subsequent-preferences are important. This fundamentally changes the game. Parties and candidates will of course continue to court voters for their first-preference votes, but if … Continue reading
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What about strategic voting?

We’re all familiar with strategic voting in our FPTP system; it goes like this: We’ve got candidates , , and ; “We” really don’t want to win, and we foresee that while each of and will get significant portions of … Continue reading
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Is Ranked-Pairs the best Condorcet system?

Is Ranked-Pairs really the best Condorcet System? If there is a Condorcet winner in respect of any given election, every Condorcet method will determine this same winner. They’re all as good as each other, at this point. The different methods … Continue reading
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Won’t we elect only centrists, who will simply agree on everything?

This is similar to the “favouring middle-of-the-road candidates” question, absent the pejorative notion of “favouring.” The idea here again seems to be that non-centrist voters would tend to find common cause in centrist candidates so that, when there is no … Continue reading
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Doesn’t preferential voting favour middle of the road candidates?

It first bears asking what does it mean to “favour” a candidate? The implication is that a preferential ballot confers an unfair benefit to such candidates, somehow putting a thumb on the scale to fudge the outcome on their behalf. … Continue reading
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